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Media Mentions

10/27/17
An article on Professional Builder about builders who are embracing universal design concepts reports that nearly three years ago Beth Tauke, associate professor of architecture, and her sister built LifeHouse, a concept home completely based on universal design principles, in the lakefront planned community of Newport Cove in Illinois and had people tour the model and answer a 65-question survey. “Seventy-eight percent of the people on the tour said they saw value in owning a UD home. That’s really good news,” she said. “People have to see value before they’ll pay for it.”
10/17/17
An article on Buffalo Rising reports an international conference commemorating the 150th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birth, his legacy and Buffalo’s preeminent place in the origins of the American Arts and Crafts movement will be celebrated Oct. 20-22, and includes an ongoing exhibition through Oct. 29 in Hayes Hall on the UB South Campus.
10/17/17
An article in Canadian Architect about the LafargeHolcim sustainability awards reports Sarah Gunawan, adjunct instructor of architecture in the UB School of Architecture and Planning, received third place in the Next Generation Prize for her playful project that imagines a wildlife habitat adapted into the single-family homes that make up Markham, Ontario.
10/15/17
An article about ways Western New York seniors can age actively reports a study conducted by the UB School of Architecture and Planning in 2012 found that Erie County has a higher population of seniors compared to the state or the nation.
10/13/17
An article in The Tennessean about Wall Street investors who have snapped up thousands of homes in Tennessee to convert them into rentals looks at the impact it will have on neighborhoods, and reports Robert Silverman, professor of urban and regional planning in the UB School of Architecture and Planning, and a colleague are gathering and analyzing property records from nine counties in the Greater Nashville market. “The single-family rental housing market is starting to get commercialized in ways that it hasn’t before,” he said. “There’s not a lot known about the impact on the housing market in general or the impact of neighbors or homeowners. That’s what this research is all about.”
10/9/17
An article reports that Robert Shibley, dean of UB’s School of Architecture and Planning, will moderate a panel discussion featuring three architecture critics who will discuss the relationship between the media and architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright’s historic place in the field of architectural writing, and the current state of architectural criticism at an event Friday at the Martin House’s Greatbatch Pavilion.
10/7/17
An article on Buffalo Rising reports UB partnered with Boston Valley Terra Cotta to create inspirational faculty mailboxes in the School of Architecture and Planning, the result of a series of design-build competitions taking place over the next few years, and quotes Robert Shibley, dean of the School of Architecture and Planning. “The mailbox competition, with the visionary partnership of Boston Valley Terra Cotta, is an emphatic opening statement of what’s possible when you combine teaching with practice,” he said.
9/23/17
An article about a presentation on Sept. 30 by the Buffalo Heritage Carousel to give an update on its progress to bring a solar-powered carousel to Canalside reports participants will include Martha Bohm, assistant professor of architecture in the UB School of Architecture and Planning.
9/13/17
An article reports talks by architects, designers, urban planners and researchers will be held as part of the “Border Crossing” series this fall at the UB School of Architecture and Planning.
9/12/17
An article in the Smithsonian about America’s lost structures includes a piece by Kerry Traynor, clinical associate professor of urban and regional planning, who laments the loss of Buffalo’s Humboldt Parkway, which was torn up in the 1950s to make way for the Kensington Expressway. “The new highway displaced families, divided neighborhoods by race and income and caused property values to plummet,” she writes.

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