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School of Architecture and Planning Magazine

In Brief

9/6/17
The School of Architecture and Planning’s professional Master of Architecture program has earned an eight-year term of continuing accreditation, the longest interval awarded by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. 
9/6/17
The School of Architecture and Planning kicked off its new graduate track in real estate development this fall. The three-semester specialization within the Master of Science in Architecture program closely engages Buffalo’s development community. “
5/3/17

Daniel B. Hess, PhD, associate professor of urban and regional planning, will spend the next two years developing design and planning solutions for these Soviet-era estates through a research fellowship that will take him to the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

5/3/17
Already a published scholar and research pioneer in rural food systems planning, urban planning student Jennifer Whittaker (MUP ‘15) was recently honored with the distinguished SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Student Excellence.
9/6/17
“Doppelgänger,” the joint master’s thesis of Nima Vakili (MArch/MFA ‘15), Vincent Krause and Jan Poneß, has recently been announced as a first-prize winner in the aed neuland German design competition.
1/11/18
Harold Cohen, who as dean from 1974-1984 nearly doubled the school’s faculty and established its philanthropic base by forming the Friends of the School of Architecture and Planning, has spent the past 15 years launching a second career as an artist. Now 90, Cohen works from his studio in downtown Buffalo experimenting with material and techniques to create prints, paintings, woodcuts and sculptures.
1/11/18
Beyond Patronage (Actar Publishers, 2015)
9/6/17
Marius Laurinkus, one of 11 students participating in a nine-week studio in China this past summer with architecture professor Shannon Bassett, paints an accurate picture of the development environment across much of China.
5/3/17
Some of the most iconic photos of Adolf Hitler show him at his most intense, eyes alight with frenetic energy as he addresses an audience or salutes a crowd. Equally haunting, however, are another set of images that are oft-forgotten: In the years preceding World War II, news outlets worldwide ran profiles of the Nazi leader that portrayed him as a country gentleman — a man who played catch with his dogs, had refined taste in décor and took post-meal strolls outside his mountain estate.