Courses

6/26/18
This second course in the undergraduate architectural media sequence will focus on building student digital drawing and modeling skills through the introduction of AutoCad and Rhino. We will discuss technical proficiency as well as effective use of these and other companion tools to create clear, well crafted and visually rich images. 
6/26/18
We are surrounded by landscapes. Every single zone of our planet is in some way a result of our conscious or unconscious human action. We are immersed within these resultant experiences, these fabricated ecologies, these designed landscapes. Many understand “landscapes” primarily as a collection of parks, backyards and urban plazas. 
6/26/18
SUNY Arts + SUNY Humanities General Education Environment + Humanity + Innovation Pathways

OPEN TO ALL UB STUDENTS 
6/26/18
This lecture course is intended to familiarize students with the historic, social, cultural, economic, and political forces which have shaped the contemporary city in the western tradition. Lectures are heavily illustrated with slides, so as to emphasize the relationships between these factors and physical design. The course briefly covers the development of the professional practice of city planning in the USA. 
6/26/18
The built environment transmits, reinforces and reproduces social values, attitudes and behaviors. Experiencing a campus, for example, shapes perceptions of the university itself, personal relationships, intellectual exploration, and professional life. These experiences and perceptions are captured and manipulated symbolically in mass media, particularly those incorporating moving images. Examples are the portrayal of the university as an “ivory tower,” a placed for “coming of age” or a setting for the practice of “weird science”. 
6/26/18
This course will explore how mass media communicate ideas, attitudes and values about the built environment to the public. Human experience and perceptions are documented and communicated in mass media, particularly those incorporating moving images. Examples are the portrayal of the university as an “ivory tower,” a placed for “coming of age” or a setting for the practice of “weird science”. 
6/26/18
Environmental Design Workshop will introduce students to communicating utilizing Graphic and Verbal Communication Skills. We will focus on visual literacy for comprehending and explaining the built environment, introducing urban planning and design concepts through readings and hands-on exercises. Class discussions and individual presentations will expose students to verbal communication skills focused on the environment.
6/26/18
Are you interested in learning about the trajectories of change in contemporary Chinese cities? This course focuses on understanding urban space and offers a multi-dimensional exploration of the new urban China. 
6/26/18
This course examines theories, concepts, and practices of housing and community development. An emphasis is placed on: neighborhood planning, housing policy, public participation, race relations, and urban social institutions in contemporary cities. Course content and activities include: readings, lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. 
6/26/18
Whose heritage is it? Who preserves it? This course takes students on a journey through heritage and preservation thought from around the world, and introduces them to globally prevalent theories and perspectives in preserving cultural heritage sites and landscapes, with the overarching theme of attempting to understand how different cultures and contexts deal with rights to cultural heritage. This course also examines various case studies from around the world (via readings, documentaries, and other media) that discuss critical issues in historic preservation today.
This course will engage a wide range of students from a variety of backgrounds.
6/26/18
In this course we will discuss the role of law in land use planning and community development, and limitations on the power of government to regulate land use. Topics include the police power, property rights, eminent domain, regulatory takings, zoning and other forms of government regulation, constitutional restrictions on land use regulation, and environmental protection. Contemporary issues will be added to the basic curriculum as the opportunity arises. We will often use open discussion as a means to reach sustainable conclusions concerning land use policy issues and conflicts. 
6/26/18
Visions of the City is a student-run, faculty-directed seminar for students culminating the Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design degree. The central purpose of the course is to read, reflect upon, and discuss books (as distinguished from journal articles or professional reports) on urban and environmental topics spanning classic visions, biographies of visionaries, and contemporary visions. Through the course, students experience reading full-length classic or contemporary works in the field both (for immediate inspiration and motivation for lifelong reading) and culminate the academic program having read, digested, reflected on, and been exposed to seminal works in urban planning and environmental design. 
6/26/18
The course examines how deals are structured, transactions are completed, and real estate law is applied to complex real estate development and investment. The course investigates the key legal and business issues typically present in the real estate development “life cycle.” 
6/26/18
This course will allow students to achieve proficiency in using the quantitative aspects of real estate financial analysis, and will promote the development of sound real estate investment and finance decision-making skills through the use of modern financial analysis. Real estate investment and financing decisions, and determinations of valuation, are made from applications of discounted cash flow models. Different equity and debt financing options will be considered, including partnerships and commercial mortgages. Securitization of equity and debt claims related to real estate will also be covered. A semester long class project will employ these principles in working through the development of a mock investment committee memorandum. 
6/26/18
Environmental resources are managed by governments, organizations, communities and other stakeholders through a broad range of policy and planning mechanisms. This course provides an introduction to the regulatory structures of environmental policy and the vision-oriented processes of environmental planning. 
6/26/18
This course offers students a survey of classic and contemporary theories of planning. The logic behind the ideas, concepts and actions of planning is continuously challenged as views shift about the relationship between democracy, markets and government. Students will gain a deeper appreciation for evolution of planning thought as well as be introduced to some of the “theoretical tools” used to analyze planning. 
6/26/18
This course is for graduate and undergraduate students in both the Planning and Architecture departments. We will cover the inter-dependency of Architectural Design, Urban Planning, Site Planning and Landscape Architecture, as they influence the planning and design of physical sites. In practice, architects and planners work as a team on projects, therefore it is of critical importance that the dialogue between architects and planners be supported and understood. Readings and projects will provide opportunities to explore that relationship, as we understand the opportunities in the design of sites.
6/26/18
Urban planning practices operate within the context of economic, environmental, and political institutions at all levels of governance. This course provides an introduction to microeconomics principles through which the neoclassical economy operates, and political economy approaches for understanding how a broad range of political system types determine economic outcomes. 
6/26/18
This course is intended to give students a solid foundation in GIS analysis and an understanding of the relevance of GIS to the planning process.
6/26/18
When Jane Doe spends a $1 on food, only 11.5 cents ends up with farmer Jill. What’s wrong with this picture? And, how can you help change the picture? If you are passionate about food access, hunger, environmental health, community well-being and public health, URP 604 is for you.

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