Courses

6/26/18
This course will offer students instruction in assembling a clear, legible, graphically compelling portfolio of their work.
6/26/18
Your portfolio is the main document showcasing your work you accomplished during your time studying architecture to a larger audience. The portfolios significance can be compared to architectural photography in the work of an architect. You will spent one semester to critically assess your work and create the strongest documentation possible of your work. 
6/26/18
The intent of the course is to provide the students with a perspective of current roles and best practices of Urban Design including learning from great precedents; principles of good urban design; and making the public realm robust, legible, sustainable, healthy, equitable, and rich in human experience.
6/26/18
The studio will foster material research in architecture as an integrated endeavor between scientific, tectonic and cultural readings. Students will exercise to express theoretical and spatial concepts through physical artifacts. Insights will be triggered by working within the material specificity and fabrication techniques of paper casting / fibers / pulp.
6/26/18
What is design research? How can an investigator articulate a research question and determine a productive field of investigation in architecture? How can we define the research scope? How can we select proper precedents and study them? What makes a good design thesis?
6/26/18
Inclusive Design empowers the people who use products, buildings and communities by taking their perspective and making it the central focus of the design process. Rooted in a critique of designer-centric practice and embracing an ethic of social responsibility, this new paradigm focuses on developing form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people.
6/26/18
This course is designed to introduce you to the phenomenon of ‘the city’ and ‘the metropolis’, terms more popularly used to describe our urban environment. 
6/26/18
END 313 is designed for students considering a career in planning. It is meant to give an insiders view of how public policy is formulated, how elected officials balance competing demands, as well as exploring developing trends in government organization, evaluation and finances. Professor Calabrese held public office for 20 years as a Town Councilman, Town Supervisor and deputy County Executive. 
6/26/18
What does race have to do with architecture? And how do the racial politics of a society shape the built environment? The purpose of this course is to find critical and productive ways of answering these questions.
6/26/18
This course introduces students to management issues in the nonprofit sector. Topics will include nonprofit: governance, board structure, planning, financial management, fundraising, grant writing, leadership, personnel management, and ethics. 
6/26/18
This course builds upon skills and lessons you have learned in Environmental Design Workshops 1 and 2 and will challenge your analytical, writing and graphic skills. You will work both independently and in groups using a diverse set of creative problem solving methods. The course applies your skills to a semester-long, team-based, real-world planning project focusing on Buffalo’s Kaisertown neighborhood.
6/26/18
This studio will utilize and build upon the analytical and graphic skills learned in Design Workshops 1 (PD350) and 2 (PD360). It will challenge your graphic and writing skills and requires you to work both independently and cooperatively in groups.
6/26/18
From the inception of an idea to the completion of a project, the construction process involves many steps and, in the case of a large project, hundreds of people to reach a successful conclusion.  This course will immerse students in the steps to undertake a successful construction project and the different approaches to construction.
6/26/18
As a future architect, you could very likely be designing commercial structures.  Through your education, you’ll learn a myriad of details to incorporate the wishes of the owners and attend to the needs of the occupants. However, one major piece is missing – how will the property be operated?
6/26/18
This course is designed to expose graduate students to quantitative analysis in planning. 
6/26/18
This course introduces students to the basic guidelines, standards, research methods and documentation techniques used in historic preservation to identify and record historic structures and sites. 
6/26/18
This course explores central city revitalization with a specific focus on the challenge of urban revitalization in shrinking cities in regions where growth is constrained. The goal is to provide students with insight into the building of just cities, which are vibrant, healthy, and exciting places to live, work, play, and raise a family.
6/26/18
This course will focus on the intrinsic relationship between transportation, land use and urban form. Students will have a firm understanding of the transportation land use cycle – of how transportation systems and travel decisions impact development and how land use patterns impact transportation systems. Students will understand how this connection or disconnect results in the visible urban form. The class will examine the history of this connection; theories of sound transportation and land use planning; national trends and emerging uncertainties transportation planners face today.
6/26/18
This seminar explores issues, trends, and debates in planning and development especially in the context of the Global South. The seminar focuses especially on the ways in which planning and development policies and strategies influence health equity in the Global South. 
6/26/18
Cities contain a remarkably diverse set of physical features, ranging from apartment buildings to factories, water treatment facilities to wildlife preserves, and alleyways to highways. Physical planners (including land-use planners, neighborhood planners, environmental planners, economic development planners, etc.) seek to guide the development of these features for the improvement of city life and livelihood. Often they do so through control or facilitation of private real estate investment. The purposes they strive for include residential well-being, environmental enhancement, enjoyment of public space, good transportation, economic prosperity, reduction of neighborhood distress, recreational opportunity, heritage preservation, public health and safety, and equity or cost-effectiveness in their achievement.

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