Courses

6/26/18
This second course in the undergraduate architectural media sequence will focus on building student digital drawing and modeling skills through the introduction of AutoCad and Rhino. We will discuss technical proficiency as well as effective use of these and other companion tools to create clear, well crafted and visually rich images. 
6/26/18
This course contextualizes the historical contributions of African-American artists into the postwar tradition of architectural utopianism. While most black writers and filmmakers were not trained as architects or interior designers, they took a strategic interest in the language and imagery of architectural modernism in order to critique the negative effects of urban renewal or the economic disinvestment of black neighborhoods in American cities. 
6/26/18
This course focuses on construction materials, systems and integrated design. Through the careful study of buildings that relate concept to construction systems and tectonics, students develop an appreciation for the value of fully resolved execution. This study locates architecture at the juncture of design intention and technical means.
6/26/18
This course provides an introduction to the environmental and the design aspects of architectural lighting and acoustics. The series presents both qualitative criteria relating to architectural concepts and computational analysis to assist design. Students will develop an understanding of interior lighting, daylighting, room acoustics and noise control as components of architectural design through a structured program of lectures, readings, exams and projects. 
6/26/18
This course will focus on the professional practice of architecture including (the following are the NAAB Student Performance Criteria addressed in the class) an understanding of the fundamentals of building costs, such as acquisition costs, project financing and funding, financial feasibility, operational costs, and construction estimating with an emphasis on life-cycle cost accounting.
6/26/18
Using technology for graphical representation has become a standard in Design practices. Understanding how technology can aid in the design, rather than inhibit creativity, has been a struggle in the emerging world of Architecture. Each professional needs to be able to leverage technology throughout the design and construction process to aid in such tasks as site planning, schematics, design development, analysis, construction documents and project management. In this course students will learn Autodesk Revit to aid in the design process and analysis, create construction documents, and render graphics for each stage of design. 
6/26/18
The focus of this studio is integrated architectural design - a synthesis of concept and construct addressing design strategy, program, site, construction, and technology. Students’ work will be informed by exploration of urban issues, history and culture as well as materiality and craft. Design proposals will be expected to address structure and environmental systems, life safety, accessibility, and material assemblies. During the semester, students will be engaged with aesthetic, technical, social, and environmental aspects of design and will consider matters ranging from the scale of the city to the tectonic detail.
6/26/18
As the second course in the graduate media sequence, ARC 512 will expand on developing analog and digital graphic skill sets. Through a series of demonstrations, lectures, and short exercises, students will be exposed to intermediate 3d modeling techniques, basic rendering, digital / hybrid illustration, and post-processing techniques. In addition to expanding technical skills, this course will introduce modeling for multiple outcomes and discuss the link between product and methodology.
6/26/18
As we consider the impacts of our actions in the age of the Anthropocene, the challenges of creating more visceral, experiential resonances in the environment is often elusive, especially as we find ourselves ever more accountable to metrics and standards of performance. How do we, as designers, harness the power that architecture already yields – as forms of communication and vehicles to shape lived experiences – to address social, economic, and ecological issues, while still advocating for design itself as an essential and critical force in our culture? How will we intervene and build with resonance in the face of the Climate Crisis?
6/26/18
The MC GRG Design Studio Manus et Machina – Hand and Machine – explores the potential combination of the direct action of the hand as the primary tool to produce material qualities, and the indirect action of the machine as the ultimate strategy to finalize material production. Working with clay as the primary material, due to its performance multiplicity throughout its various states of solidity and strength, the students will explore design actions that go from the more primal mixing, pressing, ramming, compacting, forming, and firing, to later infer the resulting pieces with water-jet precise extracting or cutting operations. 
6/26/18
This studio critiques the reductive character of type thinking in western architecture by producing a culturally-inflected mode of adaptive reuse that materially indexes the complexities of black life in the city of Buffalo. It uses the European inspired developer housing stock on the city’s East Side as a physical site for indexing the latent material customs of black life that have yet to be recorded in architecture culture.
6/26/18
The Situated Technologies Spring studio will explore the space of manufacturing and the promise of mass customization. Stan Davis in his 1987 book Future Perfect coined the term “mass customizing” to describe the change in business perception from a mass market to a mass-customized market, where products could align more specifically with individual customer needs. The advent of digitization and CNC fabrication opened the possibility for producing multiple versions of a product at relatively little cost. This forecasted the notion that accommodating a customer’s individual desires may no longer be cost prohibitive.
6/26/18
This course will explore a mixed reality workflow between digital simulation and fabrication. Using the Microsoft Hololens and Fologram, an augmented reality platform within Rhino, we will develop a process to guide the assembly of digitally fabricated parts by attempting to calibrate the digital simulation to material behavior in real time. The mixed-reality workflow may provide more experiential design feedback than the simulations alone, and may enhance the representational responsibility of digital and physical models. 
6/26/18
Creating environments which all people can experience in an inclusive and positive manner is important.  The previous course in this sequence (ARC 623: Behavior and Space) explored behavioral issues related to different environmental settings. This course will explore the methods by which we can learn about people’s responses to the designed environment. Learning about these techniques will provide evidence-based user information for your future design & planning work. The course falls within the Technical Methods domain of Inclusive Design. 
6/26/18
This course will explore universal design in practice through a case studiy method. The instrucgor will present case studies from design practice, research and service activities, much of which has been conducted at the IDEA Center over the last 20 years. Guest lectures will be included from IDEA Center staff and UB faculty. Site visits will include visits to projects in the Buffalo area and Pittsburgh. 
6/26/18
The Intellectual Domain course for the Ecological Practices Graduate Research Group will question how we perceive, define, represent, construct and reconstruct our world in relation to an evolving concept of “nature”. The course will focus on the intellectual trajectory of concepts of ecology, environment, and nature and their manifestation in art, architecture, and landscape architecture. 
6/26/18
The seminar gives students an opportunity to explore and improve techniques for assembling legible, clear, graphically engaging work portfolios. The capacity to produce, format, manipulate and present design work is a key skill in the visual communication and conceptual narrative of an architect's career. Through the completion of their assignments, students are expected to develop a graphically highly refined design portfolio at the end of the semester. The class will require design work from previous semesters, which will be the basis for the final portfolio. 
6/26/18
We are surrounded by landscapes. Every single zone of our planet is in some way a result of our conscious or unconscious human action. We are immersed within these resultant experiences, these fabricated ecologies, these designed landscapes. Many understand “landscapes” primarily as a collection of parks, backyards and urban plazas. 
6/26/18
This course examines theories, concepts, and practices of housing and community development. An emphasis is placed on: neighborhood planning, housing policy, public participation, race relations, and urban social institutions in contemporary cities. Course content and activities include: readings, lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. 
6/26/18
Whose heritage is it? Who preserves it? This course takes students on a journey through heritage and preservation thought from around the world, and introduces them to globally prevalent theories and perspectives in preserving cultural heritage sites and landscapes, with the overarching theme of attempting to understand how different cultures and contexts deal with rights to cultural heritage. This course also examines various case studies from around the world (via readings, documentaries, and other media) that discuss critical issues in historic preservation today.
This course will engage a wide range of students from a variety of backgrounds.

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