Student thesis wins national design award

“Silicone Valley” explores the socio-spatial impacts of networked technologies

Against the problematic habit of using smartphones while on the move, 'Detext' gently situates the users' attention in context.

Against the problematic habit of using smartphones while on the move, 'Detext' - one of the five "Silicone Valley" devices designed by Pinelopi Papadimitraki - gently situates the users' attention in context.

Published July 10, 2019

Thesis work by UB media architecture graduate Pinelopi Papadimitraki has won the Community Choice award for the 2019 Core77 Design Awards.

The project, titled “Silicone Valley: Breaking Techno-Mediated Habits,” explores the effects of networked technologies on our sense of self, spatial perception, and social life, and has already been honored with a Student Notable honor in the Speculative Design category.

A 2019 graduate of UB’s International Media Architecture Master Studies, Papadimitraki imagines five speculative devices that break or make techno-mediated habits, as a means to enact alternative interaction between ourselves and our environment. Instead of presenting themselves as answers, the prototypes act as contributions to the debate that might shape them.

Recognizing excellence in all areas of design enterprise, the Core77 Design Awards annually celebrates the richness of the design profession as well as the insight and perseverance of its practitioners. Now in its ninth year, the Awards program remains dedicated to excellence and inclusivity, offering both students and professionals the opportunity to promote their best work on a global scale across 19 distinct design disciplines.