Reaching Others University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
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Neighborhood Planning and Community Development

Henry Louis Taylor Jr.

Henry Louis Taylor, PhD, stands in front of student research products on Buffalo neighborhoods. He is Professor of Urban & Regional Planning, Director of the Center for Urban Studies, and Coordinator of the Specialization in Neighborhood Planning and Community Development. He teaches courses in "Race, Class, and Gender" and "Central City Revitalization."

This specialization focuses on neighborhood planning and central city revitalization. It views neighborhood planning as a citizen-driven process that interweaves the physical, economic and social dimensions of community development into a single fabric. 

The specialization is particularly concerned with the intersectionality of race, class, gender and the city building process and the ways in which urban institutions mediate socioeconomic inequalities and drive the transformation of distressed communities. Central City revitalization is viewed through a metropolitan regeneration framework that anchors urban transformation within a local economic development context. Students in Neighborhood Planning and Community Development are prepared to grapple successfully with the challenges of building the 21st century American city.

Curriculum (4 courses are required to complete the specialization)

Intro Courses (both courses are required)

  • URP 542 Central City Revitalization
  • URP 606 Community Development Processes

Methods Course (required)

  • URP 561 Qualitative Methods

Electives (Choose one)

  • URP 522 Economic Development Planning
  • URP 541 Nonprofit Management
  • URP 559 Tourism Policy and Planning
  • URP 565 Urban Planning & Design 1

Culminating Exercise:

As part of the requirement for graduation with an MUP, students seeking a specialization must prepare a professional project or at thesis related to that specialization.  In rare cases, students may believe that they are unable to fit their specialization topic into the professional project.  If so, they must still complete the professional project, but must consult with their Specialization Director about an additional class (most likely independent study) through which to demonstrate synthetic knowledge of the specialization.  This may be done only with the Specialization Director’s approval.  

Specialization Director:

Henry Louis Taylor, Jr.