Courses

6/26/18
This second course in the undergraduate architectural media sequence will focus on building student digital drawing and modeling skills through the introduction of AutoCad and Rhino. We will discuss technical proficiency as well as effective use of these and other companion tools to create clear, well crafted and visually rich images. 
6/26/18
Online Course via UBLearns

SUNY Social Science Gen. Ed.+ UB Environment Pathways Course

OPEN TO ALL UB STUDENTS
6/26/18
We are surrounded by landscapes. Every single zone of our planet is in some way a result of our conscious or unconscious human action. We are immersed within these resultant experiences, these fabricated ecologies, these designed landscapes. Many understand “landscapes” primarily as a collection of parks, backyards and urban plazas. 
6/26/18
SUNY Arts + SUNY Humanities General Education Environment + Humanity + Innovation Pathways

OPEN TO ALL UB STUDENTS 
6/26/18
This course examines how society regulates the use of land and how policy is designed to steer the development of land as a lens to carefully observe and understand modern society. The course investigates how these efforts to regulate land use and development attempt to maximize the benefit to the public by attempting to balance the combination of economic goods, natural goods, and human/social goods to maximize the public’s quality of life. 
6/26/18
This course is intended to introduce student to diverse health issues which are related with urban/physical environments in contemporary cities and stimulate interest in what is fascinating and challenging about this broad subject. Living conditions are the most important determinant of population health. 
6/26/18
This lecture course is intended to familiarize students with the historic, social, cultural, economic, and political forces which have shaped the contemporary city in the western tradition. Lectures are heavily illustrated with slides, so as to emphasize the relationships between these factors and physical design. The course briefly covers the development of the professional practice of city planning in the USA. 
6/26/18
This course will explore how mass media communicate ideas, attitudes and values about the built environment to the public. Human experience and perceptions are documented and communicated in mass media, particularly those incorporating moving images. Examples are the portrayal of the university as an “ivory tower,” a placed for “coming of age” or a setting for the practice of “weird science”. 
6/26/18
Environmental Design Workshop will introduce students to communicating utilizing Graphic and Verbal Communication Skills. We will focus on visual literacy for comprehending and explaining the built environment, introducing urban planning and design concepts through readings and hands-on exercises. Class discussions and individual presentations will expose students to verbal communication skills focused on the environment.
6/26/18
Are you interested in learning about the trajectories of change in contemporary Chinese cities? This course focuses on understanding urban space and offers a multi-dimensional exploration of the new urban China. 
6/26/18
This course examines theories, concepts, and practices of housing and community development. An emphasis is placed on: neighborhood planning, housing policy, public participation, race relations, and urban social institutions in contemporary cities. Course content and activities include: readings, lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. 
6/26/18
The issues of race, class and gender inform the U.S. metropolitan city building process, form the bulwark of racism, nativism, xenophobia, homophobia, misogyny and sexism, as well as drive our notions of the just city. The events in Ferguson, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, Dallas, Flint, and other cities combined with the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States dramatically illustrate this viewpoint. 
6/26/18
Whose heritage is it? Who preserves it? This course takes students on a journey through heritage and preservation thought from around the world, and introduces them to globally prevalent theories and perspectives in preserving cultural heritage sites and landscapes, with the overarching theme of attempting to understand how different cultures and contexts deal with rights to cultural heritage. This course also examines various case studies from around the world (via readings, documentaries, and other media) that discuss critical issues in historic preservation today.
This course will engage a wide range of students from a variety of backgrounds.
6/26/18
Overcoming global health disparities is a defining challenge of the 21st century. Finding sustainable, global solutions to end poverty and hunger, deliver clean water and quality shelter, and improve education and healthcare, however, is exceedingly complex and difficult. Using a creative, interdisciplinary approach and workshop format, the Global Innovation Challenge takes on major problems in global health, such as air pollution or refugee resettlement, to find viable solutions.
6/26/18
In a global economy, in a time of rapid industrial and technological change, cities, regions and states increasingly seek business opportunities and employment for their residents.
6/26/18
Today the National Register of Historic Places recognizes tens of thousands of buildings and over 5000 historic districts. The preservation/conservation of historically significant American sites, buildings and neighborhoods is complex. Preservation in America has evolved from the “private sector’s concern for saving patriotic sites” to a movement that is federally mandated.
6/26/18
A majors-only environmental design and development practicum. Engages students in community planning, environmental design, and urban development fieldwork in Western New York. Under the instructor's supervision, students work with clients and neighborhood groups to understand complex community planning and environmental issues, research best practices, and develop final plans, comprehensive designs, and proposals. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. 
6/26/18
In this course we will discuss the role of law in land use planning and community development, and limitations on the power of government to regulate land use. Topics include the police power, property rights, eminent domain, regulatory takings, zoning and other forms of government regulation, constitutional restrictions on land use regulation, and environmental protection. Contemporary issues will be added to the basic curriculum as the opportunity arises. We will often use open discussion as a means to reach sustainable conclusions concerning land use policy issues and conflicts. 
6/26/18
This course examines how geographical information systems (GIS) can help planners understand the function of spatial information on areas (including both cities and regions). 
6/26/18
The UB North Campus consists of a massive platform-mega structure surrounded by turf-grass, parking lots, and roads. Could UB do better? The UB Faculty Senate and Professional Staff Senate have established committees to find ways of improving our campus environment. 

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