Courses

6/26/18
This course is a required course intended to introduce 3.5 architecture students to various advanced digital and computational design applications. Topics include advanced 3D Rhino modeling, parametric modeling, and visualization through animation, drawing, and rendering.
6/26/18
What is design research? How can an investigator articulate a research question and determine a productive field of investigation in architecture? How can we define the research scope? How can we select proper precedents and study them? What makes a good design thesis?
6/26/18
On August 27, 2005 Brice Phillips moved WQRZ, a low-power community station serving Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, to the Hancock County Emergency Operations Center in advance of Hurricane Katrina. Of the 4 broadcast stations that survived the hurricane, WQRZ was the only station to remain continuously on the air. Transmitting from ground zero, Phillips disseminated information related to evacuation procedures, search and rescue operations, and distribution points for food and water. Nine months after the storm, WQRZ remained the sole broadcaster serving the area and to this day continues to be instrumental in sustaining and rebuilding the communities within its broadcast area.
6/26/18
Architects and other designers/planners have a responsibility for being knowledgeable about how their design of spaces/places affects the people who use them. When people’s needs are adequately addressed, there can be many positive results. For example, healthcare recipients can experience less stress and recover more quickly. Student learning in schools and classrooms can be enhanced; office workers can have higher levels of performance and job satisfaction, and fewer work-related illnesses, etc. Thus, it is critical that you to learn how to design humane, inclusive, useful, and enriching places and spaces. 
6/26/18
Inclusive Design empowers the people who use products, buildings and communities by taking their perspective and making it the central focus of the design process. Rooted in a critique of designer-centric practice and embracing an ethic of social responsibility, this new paradigm focuses on developing form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people.
6/26/18
This seminar is the first in a two-semester sequence that introduces theoretical and historical topics relevant for research in the design of “Situated Technologies”. It introduces students to the significant ideas that define the information environment and how they concern architecture and urbanism. Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach the course draws texts from science, engineering, information theory, aesthetics, philosophy, sociology, media, art, architecture and urbanism. It includes primary texts as well as their interpretations, providing a critical examination of the ideas and their influence on technology and society.
6/26/18
In this course, students read broadly across disciplines and time periods, texts bound by their critical engagement of speculative futures in the built environment: science fiction, architectural history and theory, art and literary criticism.
6/26/18
This course proposes a cross-disciplinary examination of real and imagined models—cosmographies—that architects, designers, artists, planners, preservationists and others have created in order to represent the image and the experience of the built environment.
6/26/18
This course is designed to introduce you to the phenomenon of ‘the city’ and ‘the metropolis’, terms more popularly used to describe our urban environment. 
6/26/18
END 313 is designed for students considering a career in planning. It is meant to give an insiders view of how public policy is formulated, how elected officials balance competing demands, as well as exploring developing trends in government organization, evaluation and finances. Professor Calabrese held public office for 20 years as a Town Councilman, Town Supervisor and deputy County Executive. 
6/26/18
What does race have to do with architecture? And how do the racial politics of a society shape the built environment? The purpose of this course is to find critical and productive ways of answering these questions.
6/26/18
This course introduces students to management issues in the nonprofit sector. Topics will include nonprofit: governance, board structure, planning, financial management, fundraising, grant writing, leadership, personnel management, and ethics. 
6/26/18
This studio will utilize and build upon the analytical and graphic skills learned in Design Workshops 1 (PD350) and 2 (PD360). It will challenge your graphic and writing skills and requires you to work both independently and cooperatively in groups.
6/26/18
This course is designed to expose graduate students to quantitative analysis in planning. 
6/26/18
This course introduces students to the basic guidelines, standards, research methods and documentation techniques used in historic preservation to identify and record historic structures and sites. 
6/26/18
This course will focus on the intrinsic relationship between transportation, land use and urban form. Students will have a firm understanding of the transportation land use cycle – of how transportation systems and travel decisions impact development and how land use patterns impact transportation systems. Students will understand how this connection or disconnect results in the visible urban form. The class will examine the history of this connection; theories of sound transportation and land use planning; national trends and emerging uncertainties transportation planners face today.
6/26/18
This fall, three graduate studios are collaborating on a plan for the future of Erie County Medical Center’s (ECMC’s) properties, in relation to the Kensington Heights community. This will be the fourth year in a row that Architecture, RED, and URP have collaborated on a complex project. The arrangement creates a dynamic, interdisciplinary learning environment.

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