Courses

The undergraduate course catalog for the School of Architecture and Planning is located:

Graduate Courses

6/26/18
Would you like to experience a dynamic learning environment that simulates interdisciplinary cutting edge practices where architects, planners, and developers work closely to produce outstanding projects that are financially feasible and transformative? Would you like to develop a large-scale project with your “real” studio client? 
6/26/18
This course focuses on the spatial structure and function of cities and regions and the roles that urban planners play in analyzing and shaping cities and regions.  The objective is to reach a critical understanding of the cultural and historical processes and planning actions and policies that have influenced cities and regions. 
6/26/18
As a future architect, you could very likely be designing commercial structures.  Through your education, you’ll learn a myriad of details to incorporate the wishes of the owners and attend to the needs of the occupants. However, one major piece is missing – how will the property be operated?
6/26/18
Planners often have the responsibility to collect, analyze, evaluate, and present data. Especially, a scenario planning tool that help planners make better decision by simulating and visualizing the data related with communities they are involved. 
6/26/18
This course will introduce students to research methods used for investigating planning issues and planning methods that are useful in the process of plan-making. Course topics include quantitative research design, research process, and basic methods of analysis including inferential statistics. 
6/26/18
This course will introduce students to research methods used for investigating planning issues and planning methods that are useful in the process of plan-making. Course topics include quantitative research design, research process, and basic methods of analysis including inferential statistics.
6/26/18
This course will introduce students to research methods used for investigating planning issues and planning methods that are useful in the process of plan-making. Course topics include quantitative research design, research process, and basic methods of analysis including inferential statistics.
6/26/18
This course is an advanced empirical methods course for graduate students in planning, policy, geography, economics, or related fields. For many graduate students, the first research project of their academic career can be challenging. 
6/26/18
This course is a “core” requirement for graduate students in the School’s Real Estate Development program. It also serves as an elective for advanced graduate students in both Urban Planning and Architecture who have a particular interest in urban development projects, and how they are put together successfully. 
6/26/18
his course addresses research methods and documentation techniques used in preservation planning to identify and record historic structures and sites. Research techniques include the development of site descriptions, historical narratives, reviewing existing scholarly and/or professional literature, collecting primary and secondary data, skills in architectural photography, and measured drawings. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork.
6/26/18
nclusive Design empowers the people who use products, buildings and communities by taking their perspective and making it the central focus of the design process. Rooted in a critique of designer-centric practice and embracing an ethic of social responsibility, this new paradigm focuses on developing form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people. 
6/26/18
This course will focus on the intrinsic relationship between transportation, land use and urban form. 
6/26/18
What is a good city? The city that is legible, healthy, resilient, and equitable? How is its urban form organized? How can you recognize it when you see one? Intended as an introduction to the field of Urban Design, this interdisciplinary course fulfills partial requirements for both an MARC-GRG/Urban Design (Technical Method) and an MUP-Urban Design Specialization track.
6/26/18
This course is intended to give students a solid foundation in GIS analysis and an understanding of the relevance of GIS to the planning process. We will meet once a week. 
6/26/18

This MUP required course will survey the evolution of physical planning as a professional field, and will introduce key theories and debates relevant to land use, the planning process, physical planning, planning law, zoning, location analysis, environmental science, and planmaking. 

6/26/18
This course studies the methods used to create and implement plans to solve diverse environmental problems.  Each week this course studies a different problem. There are assigned readings about the problem, the plan making process, and the specific methods used at the field trip site. 
6/26/18
Would you like to experience a dynamic learning environment that simulates interdisciplinary cutting edge practices where architects, planners, and developers work closely to produce outstanding projects that are financially feasible and transformative? Would you like to develop a large-scale project with your “real” studio client?