Courses

6/26/18
The seminar gives students an opportunity to explore and improve techniques for assembling legible, clear, graphically engaging work portfolios. The capacity to produce, format, manipulate and present design work is a key skill in the visual communication and conceptual narrative of an architect's career. 
6/26/18
This course will offer students instruction in assembling a clear, legible, graphically compelling portfolio of their work.
6/26/18
Your portfolio is the main document showcasing your work you accomplished during your time studying architecture to a larger audience. The portfolios significance can be compared to architectural photography in the work of an architect. You will spent one semester to critically assess your work and create the strongest documentation possible of your work. 
6/26/18
The collapse of land values in Detroit and the city’s subsequent ‘comeback,’ have been widely publicized. In a span of only ten years, towers that once sat vacant are now occupied, and construction has recently begun on the new tallest building in Michigan. Real estate speculation abounds. Yet each year, tens of thousands of families continue to lose their homes through foreclosures and water shutoffs, driving a cycle of poverty, vacancy, and blight demolition. While downtown development booms, the majority of the city suffers from disinvestment.
6/26/18
School buildings play a key role in the learning experience of millions of children in the United States. Therefore, school facilities offer a unique opportunity to engage in a national-scale effort to transform learning environments for children. This special topic seminar aims to experiment with such transformation, beginning with a K-4 public school facility built in a Northeastern suburb in the 1950s.
6/26/18
This technical methods seminar will focus on the "how-to" of paper and fiber casting, specifically for architectural and structural experiments at large scale. Students will learn about the material composition of various papers, manufacturing techniques, and analyze the structure of paper using microscopy. Orthodox methods for form-making using paper and fiber pulp will be taught as a basis for experimental fabrication approaches which students will do based on the direction of their studio projects. A work ethic involving resourcefulness, the creating of minimal waste, and a "let's see" approach to open-ended experimentation will guide this seminar.
6/26/18
The intent of the course is to provide the students with a perspective of current roles and best practices of Urban Design including learning from great precedents; principles of good urban design; and making the public realm robust, legible, sustainable, healthy, equitable, and rich in human experience.
6/26/18
The studio will foster material research in architecture as an integrated endeavor between scientific, tectonic and cultural readings. Students will exercise to express theoretical and spatial concepts through physical artifacts. Insights will be triggered by working within the material specificity and fabrication techniques of paper casting / fibers / pulp.
6/26/18
What is design research? How can an investigator articulate a research question and determine a productive field of investigation in architecture? How can we define the research scope? How can we select proper precedents and study them? What makes a good design thesis?
6/26/18
On August 27, 2005 Brice Phillips moved WQRZ, a low-power community station serving Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, to the Hancock County Emergency Operations Center in advance of Hurricane Katrina. Of the 4 broadcast stations that survived the hurricane, WQRZ was the only station to remain continuously on the air. Transmitting from ground zero, Phillips disseminated information related to evacuation procedures, search and rescue operations, and distribution points for food and water. Nine months after the storm, WQRZ remained the sole broadcaster serving the area and to this day continues to be instrumental in sustaining and rebuilding the communities within its broadcast area.
6/26/18
This course is designed to introduce you to the phenomenon of ‘the city’ and ‘the metropolis’, terms more popularly used to describe our urban environment. 
6/26/18
END 313 is designed for students considering a career in planning. It is meant to give an insiders view of how public policy is formulated, how elected officials balance competing demands, as well as exploring developing trends in government organization, evaluation and finances. Professor Calabrese held public office for 20 years as a Town Councilman, Town Supervisor and deputy County Executive. 
6/26/18
What does race have to do with architecture? And how do the racial politics of a society shape the built environment? The purpose of this course is to find critical and productive ways of answering these questions.
6/26/18
This course introduces students to management issues in the nonprofit sector. Topics will include nonprofit: governance, board structure, planning, financial management, fundraising, grant writing, leadership, personnel management, and ethics. 
6/26/18
This course builds upon skills and lessons you have learned in Environmental Design Workshops 1 and 2 and will challenge your analytical, writing and graphic skills. You will work both independently and in groups using a diverse set of creative problem solving methods. The course applies your skills to a semester-long, team-based, real-world planning project focusing on Buffalo’s Kaisertown neighborhood.
6/26/18
This studio will utilize and build upon the analytical and graphic skills learned in Design Workshops 1 (PD350) and 2 (PD360). It will challenge your graphic and writing skills and requires you to work both independently and cooperatively in groups.
6/26/18
This course focuses on the spatial structure and function of cities and regions and the roles that urban planners play in analyzing and shaping cities and regions, including the built and natural environment, environmental policies, and social and economic dynamics. The objective is to reach a critical understanding of the cultural and historical processes and planning actions and policies that have influenced cities and regions. 
6/26/18
This course introduces students to the basic guidelines, standards, research methods and documentation techniques used in historic preservation to identify and record historic structures and sites. 
6/26/18
This course explores central city revitalization with a specific focus on the challenge of urban revitalization in shrinking cities in regions where growth is constrained. The goal is to provide students with insight into the building of just cities, which are vibrant, healthy, and exciting places to live, work, play, and raise a family.
6/26/18
This seminar explores issues, trends, and debates in planning and development especially in the context of the Global South. The seminar focuses especially on the ways in which planning and development policies and strategies influence health equity in the Global South. 

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