Courses

6/26/18
This technical methods seminar will focus on the "how-to" of paper and fiber casting, specifically for architectural and structural experiments at large scale. Students will learn about the material composition of various papers, manufacturing techniques, and analyze the structure of paper using microscopy. Orthodox methods for form-making using paper and fiber pulp will be taught as a basis for experimental fabrication approaches which students will do based on the direction of their studio projects. A work ethic involving resourcefulness, the creating of minimal waste, and a "let's see" approach to open-ended experimentation will guide this seminar.
6/26/18
In the first half of this course, we will develop our own surveying tools in the shop to investigate a portion of Silo City in Buffalo, New York. Tools developed in the class will incorporate traditional remote sensing and surveying equipment (for position), digital and analog monitors (for phenomena), and will be recorded on a digital or paper template. In the second half of the course, students will learn to integrate and interpret these data using traditional software tools like GIS. The final project for the class will support the designs of the EP GRG studio; co-registration with the EP GRG studio is required.
6/26/18
The Ecological Practices Graduate Research Group Fall 2019 Studio will start a year long project to design an architectural and landscape intervention that facilitates observation of both the landscape and local wildlife in Silo City. This studio will address how one turns a once functioning industrial site into a site of ecological renewal. 
6/26/18
This studio will explore the design of a Gallery Complex as a means to investigate the incorporation of various technologies into the integrated design of a building. 
6/26/18
This studio will be about design for creativity and entrepreneurism. It will explore the creation of a student oriented small business incubator for UB. Three sites will be studied, one on each of the three campuses. The project will include research and analysis, visioning exercises, space programming and building design. UB’s Capital Planning Group and other university units will participate. 
6/26/18
The studio will foster material research in architecture as an integrated endeavor between scientific, tectonic and cultural readings. Students will exercise to express theoretical and spatial concepts through physical artifacts. Insights will be triggered by working within the material specificity and fabrication techniques of paper casting / fibers / pulp.
6/26/18

This studio will study the architecture of that response by situating recent technological advancements in materials and off-site manufacturing within the context of IDP settlements.  Specifically, we will focus on semi-temporary dwelling clusters that take into consideration these logistical challenges while proposing inventive formal and material-driven partitioning structures that provide spatial quality in light of such events.  

6/26/18
In this studio, students expand and dive deeper into this paradox of borders through the questions posed by Dimensions of Citizenship, the U.S. Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. The semester’s work will be catalyzed by the specific conditions of immigration, refugees, and asylum-seekers in Buffalo and western New York. 
6/26/18
This course is a required course intended to introduce 3.5 architecture students to various advanced digital and computational design applications. Topics include advanced 3D Rhino modeling, parametric modeling, and visualization through animation, drawing, and rendering.
6/26/18
What is design research? How can an investigator articulate a research question and determine a productive field of investigation in architecture? How can we define the research scope? How can we select proper precedents and study them? What makes a good design thesis?
6/26/18
On August 27, 2005 Brice Phillips moved WQRZ, a low-power community station serving Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, to the Hancock County Emergency Operations Center in advance of Hurricane Katrina. Of the 4 broadcast stations that survived the hurricane, WQRZ was the only station to remain continuously on the air. Transmitting from ground zero, Phillips disseminated information related to evacuation procedures, search and rescue operations, and distribution points for food and water. Nine months after the storm, WQRZ remained the sole broadcaster serving the area and to this day continues to be instrumental in sustaining and rebuilding the communities within its broadcast area.
6/26/18
Architects and other designers/planners have a responsibility for being knowledgeable about how their design of spaces/places affects the people who use them. When people’s needs are adequately addressed, there can be many positive results. For example, healthcare recipients can experience less stress and recover more quickly. Student learning in schools and classrooms can be enhanced; office workers can have higher levels of performance and job satisfaction, and fewer work-related illnesses, etc. Thus, it is critical that you to learn how to design humane, inclusive, useful, and enriching places and spaces. 
6/26/18
Inclusive Design empowers the people who use products, buildings and communities by taking their perspective and making it the central focus of the design process. Rooted in a critique of designer-centric practice and embracing an ethic of social responsibility, this new paradigm focuses on developing form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people.
6/26/18
This seminar is the first in a two-semester sequence that introduces theoretical and historical topics relevant for research in the design of “Situated Technologies”. It introduces students to the significant ideas that define the information environment and how they concern architecture and urbanism. Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach the course draws texts from science, engineering, information theory, aesthetics, philosophy, sociology, media, art, architecture and urbanism. It includes primary texts as well as their interpretations, providing a critical examination of the ideas and their influence on technology and society.
6/26/18
In this course, students read broadly across disciplines and time periods, texts bound by their critical engagement of speculative futures in the built environment: science fiction, architectural history and theory, art and literary criticism.
6/26/18
This course introduces students to management issues in the nonprofit sector. Topics will include nonprofit: governance, board structure, planning, financial management, fundraising, grant writing, leadership, personnel management, and ethics. 
6/26/18
This course is designed to expose graduate students to quantitative analysis in planning. 
6/26/18
This course introduces students to the basic guidelines, standards, research methods and documentation techniques used in historic preservation to identify and record historic structures and sites. 
6/26/18
This course will focus on the intrinsic relationship between transportation, land use and urban form. Students will have a firm understanding of the transportation land use cycle – of how transportation systems and travel decisions impact development and how land use patterns impact transportation systems. Students will understand how this connection or disconnect results in the visible urban form. The class will examine the history of this connection; theories of sound transportation and land use planning; national trends and emerging uncertainties transportation planners face today.

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