Courses

Undergraduate Courses

The undergraduate course catalog for the School of Architecture and Planning is located:

Graduate Courses

6/26/18
The building of cities is—and always has been—an activity with many moving parts. This studio will explore the calibration of those parts. In so doing, we will examine the theme of collective social engagement in the design and construction of shared spaces for the built environment.
6/26/18

This studio will be closely coordinated with ARC 619: Architecture and the Information Environment and ARC 593 Code and Space. No prior conceptual or technical expertise required.

6/26/18
This studio initiates an inquiry at the intersection of industrial activity and ecological practice; it seeks to borrow from the systemic organizations of ecological systems to organize and construct industrial places. Both require understanding of how resources flow between and among many participants as part of a complex, interdependent system.  
6/26/18

This studio proposes to re-engage with “unoriginal things” that make up the urban landscape of weak market cities. We will look at both the traditional (housing, schools, shops, religious institutions, street, park, etc.) and non-traditional (vacant buildings and lots, informal paths, storefront churches, corner stores, etc.) components.

6/26/18
This studio will begin by researching the historical development of Irish-American culture in South Buffalo and the relationship to contemporary notions of cultural center. In addition, the initial research will explore the possibility of incorporating the display of culturally significant objects. 
6/26/18
Would you like to experience a dynamic learning environment that simulates interdisciplinary cutting edge practices where architects, planners, and developers work closely to produce outstanding projects that are financially feasible and transformative? Would you like to develop a large-scale project with your “real” studio client? 
6/26/18
This course is intended to introduce students to various digital and computer tools and applications. Topics covered in this course will include image processing, vector drawing, 3D modeling, Parametric Modeling, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and rendering techniques. Sessions are intended to provide students with hands-on instruction in order to assist in developing comfortable application of advanced technology to building design and construction.
6/26/18
This seminar helps students develop a sound methodological foundation for their individual thesis project. A thesis is meant to demonstrate competence in the field of architecture by framing a relevant question, conducting rigorous inquiry, and formulating a clear argument for ongoing discussion with faculty. The goal of the seminar is to guide you in the beginning stages of this process.
6/26/18

Code and Space is a fast-paced design workshop aimed at providing students with an introduction to both the tools and concepts required for creating objects, spaces, and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings. 

6/26/18

The course provides an overview and working knowledge of the Inclusive Design paradigm. It introduces principles and knowledge bases, the concept of evidence based practice, methods of criticism and evaluation, and best practice examples.

6/26/18

This course examines the many ways in which humans respond to (and often modify) both private and public space. It falls within the intellectual domain of Inclusive Design.

6/26/18

This course examines the many ways in which humans respond to (and often modify) both private and public space. It falls within the intellectual domain of Inclusive Design.

6/26/18

This interdisciplinary seminar will study how ecological and social models of biology such as those advanced by Huxley and Waddington played a crucial role in the reformulation of the built environment as part of a complex system of adaptive interactions. 

6/26/18

In this intellectual domain course in urban design, we will examine the city through the lenses of shifting uses, adaptations, and emergent typologies established and revealed over time, made possible by the peculiarities and politics of place and poverty.

6/26/18
The seminar explores specific strategies related to the tectonics of the knot, providing students with an opportunity to deepen on the material expression around the action of weaving, as a condition that brings together basic constructive traditions with contemporary architectural production. 
6/26/18
This course will introduce the student to the principles and processes of real estate development. 
6/26/18
As a future architect, you could very likely be designing commercial structures.  Through your education, you’ll learn a myriad of details to incorporate the wishes of the owners and attend to the needs of the occupants. However, one major piece is missing – how will the property be operated?
6/26/18
This course is a “core” requirement for graduate students in the School’s Real Estate Development program. It also serves as an elective for advanced graduate students in both Urban Planning and Architecture who have a particular interest in urban development projects, and how they are put together successfully.
6/26/18
This course addresses research methods and documentation techniques used in preservation planning to identify and record historic structures and sites. 
6/26/18
From the inception of an idea to the completion of a project, the construction process involves many steps and, in the case of a large project, hundreds of people to reach a successful conclusion.  This course will immerse students in the steps to undertake a successful construction project and the different approaches to construction.