AED 198 / 199: UB Seminar: Architecture and the Human Body

People experiencing the interior of The National Memorial for Peace and Justice Montgomery, AL, United States.

People experiencing the interior of The National Memorial for Peace and Justice Montgomery, AL, United States. Photographer: Alan Ricks 

This UB Seminar on Architecture and the Human Body engages students with questions of significance in architecture and the wider world. The Seminar helps students with critical thinking, ethical reasoning, communication skills, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The course includes an introduction to ways that design and related disciplines are studied within a large research university.

The dialogue about the relationship between architecture and the human body has been documented in treatises from Vitruvius' time to the present day. These writings reflect societal constructs, and provide an understanding of ways of thinking throughout history. Because of technological advances and cultural shifts, the designed environment and the human body are transforming more rapidly today than at any time in history. We are living longer. We are more diverse. We are more digitally connected to our built environments, and, in turn, our built environments are more responsive to us. At the same time, there are fundamental principles grounded in our relationships to space, material, place and use that remain core to our existence, at least for now. 

Faculty

4/4/19
Beth Tauke is associate professor in the Department of Architecture. Her research focuses on beginning design education and inclusive design’s relationship to the senses. 

This seminar explores ways that the human body affects architecture, and ways that architecture can affect the human body. We apply gestalt principles in sensory, spatial, and material modes to understand the basics of these human/architecture relationships. In addition, we explore ways that both architecture and the human body are changing, and discuss the possible implications of these changes.